Plateaus & Falls Precinct

Wannon Falls

Wannon Falls

Wannon Falls (23)
The Wannon Falls were created by lava flows that surged upstream to the Wannon River. The water which cascades over a 30-metre vertical precipice into a deep plunge pool below, is actually flowing over hardened basalt lava. Further downstream, rapids wind their way around large blocks of basalt, dislodged over time down the embankments of the narrow valley. A cantilevered viewing platform at the Wannon Falls offers spectacular views. A nearby rotunda features interpretative signage for visitors, covering geology, flora and fauna, Koori history and details of colonial artists who painted in the area. Camping facilities are available at the Wannon River.

Wannon Falls

Wannon Falls

Nigretta Falls

Nigretta Falls

Nigretta Falls (24)
Nigretta Falls is a small waterfall set in outstanding scenery. The waterfall is considered more spectacular than Wannon Falls, due to its clearer features. It has excellent river walks and viewing areas with barbecue facilities and red gum picnic tables and a jarrah timber stairway leading to the base of the falls.

Nigretta Falls

Nigretta Falls

Casterton
Casterton is a relatively small rural centre of about 2000 people located on the banks of the Glenelg River in a valley surrounded by rolling hills. Situated 352 km west of Melbourne and 63 km west of Hamilton on the Glenelg Highway, it is a service centre to a large pastoral, mixed farming, timber-producing and dairying district near the South Australian border. Casterton has a golf course, a racecourse, a caravan park, a sports and leisure centre and there are numerous sporting facilities in Island Park, off Murray St. There are a number of scenic attractions in the area.

The Casterton Kelpie Muster attracts people to the town which is known as the Birthplace of the Kelpie.

Things to see:

Mickle Lookout
Mickle Lookout is located on the northern side of town. Head off the highway along Robertson St and turn left into Moodie St. The lookout proffers fine views over the town.

Warrock Homestead Complex
The ‘Warrock’ station was established in 1841 and was taken over, in 1843, by Scottish cabinet-maker George Robertson. By 1860, when he obtained free-hold title to the land, he had erected about 40 buildings which constituted something of a private village. He initially lived in a cottage which he constructed of Tasmanian timber, handmade nails and blackwood shingles. 33 of Robertson’s well-preserved buildings remain. Principally designed after mid-19th century pattern book sources, they typically feature Gothic effects such as steeply-pitched roofs with pronounced gables, fretted bargeboards and finials and are spread out over two acres. They include the original cottage, the homestead (built from 1848 to 1853 and retaining the hand-made original timber furniture), the fine woolshed, a smokehouse, a slaughtering shed, the shearer’s quarters, a belfry (the bell was used to summon hands to meals), a dairy, a grain store, a baking house, the stables, a blacksmith’s and the brick dog compound which housed the canines used to hunt the local dingoes to extinction. It is argued that Robertson bred the first kelpie at Warrock. The architectural and historical value of these buildings is recognised by the National Trust which considers it the “most important pastoral station complex in Victoria”. Robertson’s descendants lived on the property until 1991 and there is much in the way of antique equipment and tools (steam engines, treadle lathes, chaff cutters etc). There is a picnic area and it is open daily from 10.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. An admission fee is charged. To get to Warrock homestead you can head east of Casterton along the Glenelg Highway for 6 km and turn left onto the Chetwynd Rd. After 15 km take the signposted left into Warrock Rd and it is several kilometres to the complex. Alternatively, if you are travelling north of Casterton along the Apsley Rd turn right into Warrock Rd 24 km north of Casterton, tel: (03) 5582 4222 .

Bilstons Tree
About 10 or 15 km further north along the Chetwynd Rd is a signposted turnoff on the left to Bilstons Tree which is considered to have the largest volume of millable river red gum in the world. It is thought to be 800 years old and stands over 40 m high with a girth of seven metres, consisting of 9100 cubic feet of timber.

Baileys Rocks and Dergholm State Park
Baileys Rocks are a series of enormous and unusual green-coloured granite boulders in a dry creek bed within the northern section of Dergholm State Park. Follow the Apsley Rd (aka the Naracoorte Rd) north-west for about 39 km (about 6 km beyond the settlement of Dergholm) and a signposted turnoff on the right leads to the Baileys Rocks Picnic and Camping Area where there are toilets, fuel barbecues, picnic tables, drinking water and two walking tracks. A short (3230-metre) loop track leads to the boulders while the Rocky Creek Trail (5 km return) starts further upstream. It is clearly marked by blue arrows and is about 5 km return. There are also driving tracks in the park which features a diversity of vegetation (woodlands, open forests, heath and swamp communities and spectacular spring wildflowers) and fauna (red-tailed black cockatoos, swift parrots, echidnas, koalas, grey kangaroos and a range of reptiles). A spotlight walk at night may afford a glimpse of nocturnal animal life such as sugar gliders. The park covers 10 400 ha and is divided into two blocks which are separated by the Dergholm-Edenhope Rd. Once occupied by the Kanal gundidj clan (part of the Jardwadjali language group), it was declared a Park in 1992. Phone (03) 5581 2427 for further details.

Carmichael Track
The Carmichael Track is signposted off the Casterton- Penola Rd (the Glenelg Highway), west of Casterton. The main picnic area (which has barbecue and toilet facilities) is readily accessible by car but a 4WD is required to venture further at certain times of the year. The walking track leads through an abundance of wildflowers in season, though it is pleasant at any time of the year.

Longlead Swamp Track
Longlead Swamp Track is further west (about 11 km from Casterton) along the highway (signposted to the right). It is another bush track with wildflowers and barbecue facilities. There are waterbirds, kangaroos and emus.

Peter Francis Points Arboretum
The Peter Francis Points Arboretum, or ‘The Points’, is a native Australian plant collection, located on the edge of the town of Coleraine. Situated on 37 hectares, the collection contains in excess of 10,000 plants, and includes 63 rare and endangered native species.
The Points contains a collection of Eucalypts (registered with the Garden Plant Conservation Association of Australia Inc), and features a range of walking trails. It is a beautiful location for a picnic, as well as an amazing botanical reference.
Visit the Points, and marvel at one of the largest collections of Eucalypts in the Southern Hemisphere, as well as extensive collections of other Australian plants.

The Points contains a collection of Eucalypts (registered with the Garden Plant Conservation Association of Australia Inc), and features a range of walking trails. It is a beautiful location for a picnic, as well as an amazing botanical reference.
Visit the Points, and marvel at one of the largest collections of Eucalypts in the Southern Hemisphere, as well as extensive collections of other Australian plants.


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